Tuesday, June 25, 2019

3 Random Facts You Didnt Know about Orthodontics:


Orthodontists today can successfully correct most problems regardless of the patient’s age. Here at Quest Johnson Orthodontics, our practice's top priority is to provide you with the highest quality orthodontic care in a friendly, comfortable environment. Here are three random facts you may not know of orthodontics.


1. The word “orthodontics” is of Greek origin.
“Ortho” means straight or correct. “Dont” (not to be confused with “don’t”) means tooth. Put it all together and “orthodontics” means straight teeth.

2. Teeth move in response to pressure over time.
Some pressure is beneficial, however, some is harmful. Actions like thumb-sucking or swallowing in an abnormal way generate damaging pressure. Teeth can be pushed out of place; bone can be distorted.

Orthodontists use appliances like braces or aligners to apply a constant, gentle pressure on teeth to guide them into their ideal positions

3. Gold was the metal of choice for braces circa 1900.
Gold is malleable, so it was easy to shape it into an orthodontic appliance. Because gold is malleable, it stretches easily. Consequently, patients had to see their orthodontist frequently for adjustments that kept treatment on track.

Thursday, June 20, 2019

What Does Two Phase Treatment Fix?


Two-phase orthodontic treatment can be used to: Help the jaws develop to ensure adequate space for all of the permanent teeth, especially the permanent canines.


  • May reduce the need to pull permanent teeth in the future. 
  • Some problems that can be treated quite well in a growing child but may require corrective surgery if treatment occurs after growth ends. 
  • Normalize the relationship of the upper jaw to the lower jaw, especially in the case of an underbite. 
  • Intervene in a child’s prolonged sucking or abnormal swallowing. 
  • Damaging pressure can move teeth in the wrong directions and/or change the shape of the bone that supports teeth. 
  • Tuck in upper front teeth that stick out to reduce the risk of those teeth being broken or knocked out.




Tuesday, June 11, 2019

2 Common Bites in Orthodontics


Our smiles are uniquely ours. However so is our bite. “In orthodontics, “bite” refers to the way the upper and lower teeth come together. A bad bite, called a “malocclusion,” happens when teeth meet improperly, or they don’t meet at all,” according to the American Association of Orthodontist.

There are various bites that affect how we speak, eat and our overall mouth. Two common bites, orthodontic treatment can fix is a crossbite and underbite.

A crossbite occurs when the upper teeth fit inside of lower teeth. Can be caused by misalignment of teeth or a misalignment of the bone; can affect a single tooth or groups of teeth. Your jaw may shift to one side if not corrected and wears down on your tooth enamel.

An underbite happens when the lower jaw sits in front of the upper jaw. An underbite impacts tooth wear and adds a stress on your jaw joints. Through orthodontic treatment, these bites can be corrected and help keep you healthy, beyond an aesthetically pleasing smile.

Monday, June 3, 2019

National Oral Health Month


June is Oral Health Month. A good oral hygiene routine is the foundation to a healthy smile, especially for young children. For parents, leading by example, should establish healthy habits like brushing, cleaning between your teeth and seeing your dentist. This ultimately leads to the big difference in the health and happiness of your entire family and in children, less fears about visiting their dentist.

Here are 2 tips from the American Dental Association that are a great reminder to enforce.

Start a Routine and Stick to It:
You may be tempted to let your child skip brushing after a long day or during times when your normal schedule is off (like vacation), but keep at it. The more second nature brushing becomes the easier it will be to make sure your child is brushing twice a day for two minutes.

Kids Need to Floss: 
It doesn't matter if you clean between ​your child's teeth before or after they brush as long as you clean between any teeth that touch. You can use child-friendly plastic flossing tools to more easily clean between your child’s teeth until your child learns to do it.

Thursday, May 30, 2019

The Invisalign Process at Quest Johnson Orthodontics



Whether you’re considering Invisalign treatment for yourself or someone else, knowing more about the entire process can help you be more confident in your decision to choose Invisalign.

During your initial consultation, we will discuss your concerns to determine if you are a good candidate for Invisalign. We will take x-rays of your teeth, which will be used to create digital 3-D images. From these images, Drs. Quest and Johnson will map out your treatment plan and tell you the approximate length of treatment.

While every case is unique to each patient, treatment typically takes approximately 12 to 18 months. Based on your individual treatment plan, a series of clear aligners will be created specifically for you. These aligners are made of a smooth, comfortable, BPA-free plastic that won't irritate your cheeks and gums. You will begin wearing your aligners throughout the day and remove them when you eat or brush and floss your teeth. As you wear each set of aligners, your teeth gently and gradually begin to shift into place. To monitor your progress, you will also have occasional checkups with our office, usually only every six weeks or so.

For best results and a timely outcome, you should wear your aligners for 20 to 22 hours per day, throughout your entire treatment.

Friday, May 17, 2019

What is Two Phase Orthodontic Treatment?


Two-phase orthodontic treatment is a very specialized process that encompasses jaw and facial changes and tooth straightening. The major advantage of two-phase treatment is to maximize the opportunity to accomplish the ideal healthy, functional, aesthetic and comfortable result that will remain stable. In some cases interceptive treatment prevents adult tooth extractions or major jaw surgery.

Interceptive orthodontic care is one of the most rewarding treatment options that we offer to our patients. Interceptive care is exactly that, intercepting a problem before it gets out of hand. Treatment occurs at a younger age than conventional orthodontic care and is not typically as long. The idea is to shift teeth, manipulate growth, create space for unerupted teeth, break habits and prevent trauma before it is too late. Children between the ages of 7 and 10 are best suited for this sort of treatment. They are flexible, compliant and their growth potential is still at a maximum. Treatment usually lasts 4 to 12 months after which the child is monitored and the decision as to the need for a second phase is made. Most children will require a second, more comprehensive, phase of treatment in order to create a completely stable, functional and aesthetic occlusion.

Second phase treatment begins once most of the adult teeth have erupted. This phase usually requires 12 months with braces on all of the teeth. After the second phase of treatment retainers will be worn in order to hold the teeth in the correct position.

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

First Day in Braces


The adhesive used to attach the braces to your teeth cures rapidly, but takes several hours to completely cure. You can eat any time after leaving our office, however, we ask that you remember the list of foods that may be harmful to your braces. Until you become accustomed to eating with your new braces, you may find it beneficial to follow a diet consisting of all soft foods.

Initially, the braces feel like they stick out. This is normal. As you become accustomed to your braces and tooth alignment improves, this sensation will cease to be a concern. Although the brackets have been rounded and smoothed, until the cheek tissues have toughened, you may find it helpful to use a small piece of orthodontic wax around the bracket that is creating the irritation. If your supply of wax runs out, call our office for more. The wax may also be purchased at a local drug store.

You will probably notice some discomfort beginning a few hours after your braces are placed. Some teeth, usually the front teeth, may be tender and sensitive to pressure. Occasionally, patients report that they experience no discomfort, but most patients have some soreness beginning during the first few hours and dissipating within a day or two. Exactly when the discomfort ceases is impossible to predict and differs with each patient. Non-prescription pain remedies are recommended for discomfort. For maximum effectiveness, it may be best to take such medications before the discomfort begins.